Blog FPO

Racial Equity Statements: Eloquent Words, but Do You Mean It?

2020 was the year no one could have predicted. We endured two crises simultaneously in COVID-19 and the ongoing racial tensions within our country. Perhaps for the first time I noticed a significant increase in organizations providing statements and reflections on diversity, equity, and inclusion. And they were appreciated. But it also prompts a series of actions from me.

The questioning period. Do you mean it? The words that you have taken the time to eloquently share. How are you demonstrating that commitment?

Let me check the organization’s leadership. Perhaps the answer rests in the composition of the individuals required for making decisions. Nope.

Okay how about the Board of Directors? Not one person that looks like me. So how can I believe you? How do I know these words mean anything to you?

And again, I’m less interested in the statement and more curious about how it is being applied. As individuals and institutions, it is time to start thinking deeply about what it means to be white and how race has shaped your life - interactions with others, opportunities in work, and the list goes on. And how flat your messaging falls when you speak about diversity and none is reflected within your organization. I hesitate on talking about equity, inclusion and belonging because we should start with the basics.

Taking a stand is nice, yet insufficient. How will you walk? Where are you going? And who is coming with you?

Event Garde Racial Equity Statement Update

As an exclusively white organization, Event Garde recognizes that we have only begun on a much longer journey toward structural and not merely symbolic change. Here are the commitments we made in our racial equity statement last year, some examples of actions we’ve taken since it was published and examples of ways we continue to hold ourselves accountable going forward. 

Read More >

Racial Equity Statements: Eloquent Words, but Do You Mean It?

2020 brought a significant increase in organizations providing statements and reflections on diversity, equity, and inclusion. While they were appreciated, it also prompts a series of actions.

Read More >

The Importance of Honoring Black History Month

Every year Black History Month sparks the annual debate about using one month to celebrate the history and accomplishments of African Americans. In 1926, when Carter G. Woodson pioneered the idea of Negro History Week, we’re sure he would have never imagined a whole month to coordinate the teaching of history of Black Americans in our nation’s public schools. And now 95 years later, James Bell III wants more.

Read More >

Indigenous land acknowledgments as forms of appreciation, not appropriation.

Creating and using land acknowledgement statements can be a concrete step toward bringing historical and contemporary oppression of Indigenous people into present consciousness. They can communicate appreciation and honor those whose land you now stand on. However, they can also show up as cultural appropriation or modern-day colonization.

Read More >

Healthcare, we have a problem.

How is it that the place I should be going to be healed, isn’t equipped to handle discussions on racism and its impact on my health? Well, because it is hard to be honest and say, I helped to create this problem. Or help to perpetuate this problem. Or even further, I benefit from this problem. So how do we fix it?

Read More >

Centering Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Healthy Aging

Healthy aging. The phrase evokes images of older adults riding bikes, working in a garden or eating healthy foods. Healthy aging is so much more than activities older adults engage in each day. No one wakes up one day in their 60s in sudden good health. Healthy aging is part of the life continuum, meaning it’s influenced by what happens to us across our lifetime and by the conditions in the social and physical environments in which people are born, live, play, and work.

Read More >