Blog FPO

Gardian of the Month: Jenny Hill

Q & A with Jenny Hill, manager for social communications at Event Garde.

Q: Learn: Let’s say you’re studying for a big exam. Are you a crammer, or do you like to plan ahead?

A: I’m a plan ahead crammer.  I schedule time to study right before the exam – say, the last two days before the exam.  I find that I can apply myself to the task at hand more when I’m under a time crunch. 

Q: Network: Social media or face-to-face? Which form of networking is better and why?

A: I’m not a natural networker. As an introvert, I find it easier to network through social media – at first.  I enjoy building a relationship before actually meeting someone face-to-face. For me, this helps soothe my shy and nervous natural state. That being said, I do enjoy the experience when I finally get to meet someone in person.

Q: Transfer: What resources/tools do you find most helpful in helping you retain knowledge?

A:  I am a hands-on learner – anything that I can learn through actually doing it will have a significantly higher retention rate.  I suppose, then, that the tool would be my hands.

Q: Please share with us you can’t live without.

A:  If I’m being totally honest, it would be Google. If I’m working in a program and need to find out how to do something, I’ve found that asking Google is a huge time saver. There’s a whole wide world out there and I’m not afraid to ask it when I need help.

Q: Would you rather swim in a pool, lake or ocean…and why? 

A: A pool 100 percent! I’m not a fan of the unknown, and do not appreciate something unexpected touching me – be it seaweed or otherwise!

Gardian of the Month: Andrea Starmer

Our Gardian of the Month is Andrea Starmer! She shares how she might help a wallflower loosen up at a networking event, the way she prepared for the CMP, the resource she can't live without (you probably can't either) and just who's life she'd like to live for one day. 

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Applying Our Understanding of Personal & Social Identities Within Associations

During the pandemic, I was introduced by my colleague to the University of Michigan Inclusive Campus Collaborative which seeks to foster a campus climate in which all community members feel respected, valued, and empowered to engage in the life of the university. Among the resources developed and shared by the Collaborative are two identity wheels, which I’ve found useful in helping association staff, volunteer leaders, and/or members better understand themselves, one another, and how they can improve their interpersonal relationships.

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Are Too Many Meetings Wreaking Havoc on Your Employees’ Mental Health?

Are you have too many meetings and it's causing you (and your team) mental health issues? Find out here.

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A Practical Guide to Stakeholder Mapping & Why It’s Important

There are two primary groups of people involved in your organization’s strategy work: participants and stakeholders. Depending upon their lived experiences, tenure in your industry, engagement with your organization, and a host of other factors, the opinions, insights, and recommendations of your members are going to vary greatly. Want to test it out? Ask a group of 10 members how to solve just about anything and you’re likely to get several dozen suggestions. And that’s because how people see the world, including the blocks and barriers impeding our organizations from achieving their preferred visions, varies.

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Gardian of the Month: Rachel Kuntzsch

Our Gardian of the Month is Rachel Kuntzsch! Check out her tip for balancing work and studying with family time, why the New York Times is her go-to resources and why she feels Spring truly represents her!

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Navigating Difficult Conversations Using Nonviolent Communication

During a recent strategic planning session, participants were working in small groups when Aaron overheard a participant make a comment that didn't sit well with their colleague.  Aaron and his co-facilitator brainstormed a course of action and turned to nonviolent communication.  This is how it went.

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