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Anti-Racism Resources

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To be antiracist is a radical choice in the face of history, requiring a radical reorientation of our consciousness. IBRAM KENDI - "How to be an Antiracist"

So far this Black History Month we’ve heard from our Gardian of the Month, James Bell, on the importance of honoring Black History Month for more than just February and what it truly looks like to live out the racial equity statements we make as institutions. We gave an update on Event Garde’s racial equity statement to see where we are so far and to identify the work we still have to do. So what do we do with the information we’ve shared?

Our hope is that something we’ve shared has generated new ideas about ways to uphold the values of anti-racism, both in your personal and professional life. Being anti-racist is an ongoing commitment to do our own work and interrogate our complicity in (and perpetuation of) systemic racism. To that end we have curated a list of resources to assist in furthering that work, beginning with this article from scholars Kirsten Ivey-Colson and Lynn Turner who outline 10 Keys to Everyday Anti-Racism and invite us to engage in a 30 day anti-racism challenge.

Other resources, also listed on Event Garde’s Diversity, Equity and Inclusion page, are below. Please feel free to share the resources you’re using in the comments. We hope to hear from you about the new ways you engage with anti-racism and the work you’re doing to create a more just world for all of us.

  • dRworks has a wealth of information regarding dismantling racism, including definitions, assumptions and workbooks, many of which can be used free of charge with proper attribution.
  • One resource we use often on the culture of White Supremacy can be found here
  • Anti-racist reading list: http://www.eracce.org/resources
  • Podcast on the Limitations of an Anti-Racist Reading List
  • Educational graphic on contradictions for white people in racial justice work from the Instagram account @malefragility.

Your Website is (Likely) Non-Compliant

Is your website ADA compliant? Can someone get from your main event page all the way through the registration process without barriers? How do you know? Run your website - either your association, organization or event site through a free online accessibility tool. Then work to correct areas of non-compliance with your web developer or designer.

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Anti-Racism Resources

Our hope is that something we’ve shared this month has generated new ideas about ways to uphold the values of anti-racism, both in your personal and professional life. Being anti-racist is an ongoing commitment to do our own work and interrogate our complicity in (and perpetuation of) systemic racism. To that end we have curated a list of resources to assist in furthering that work.

Read More >

Event Garde Racial Equity Statement Update

As an exclusively white organization, Event Garde recognizes that we have only begun on a much longer journey toward structural and not merely symbolic change. Here are the commitments we made in our racial equity statement last year, some examples of actions we’ve taken since it was published and examples of ways we continue to hold ourselves accountable going forward. 

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Racial Equity Statements: Eloquent Words, but Do You Mean It?

2020 brought a significant increase in organizations providing statements and reflections on diversity, equity, and inclusion. While they were appreciated, it also prompts a series of actions.

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The Importance of Honoring Black History Month

Every year Black History Month sparks the annual debate about using one month to celebrate the history and accomplishments of African Americans. In 1926, when Carter G. Woodson pioneered the idea of Negro History Week, we’re sure he would have never imagined a whole month to coordinate the teaching of history of Black Americans in our nation’s public schools. And now 95 years later, James Bell III wants more.

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Indigenous land acknowledgments as forms of appreciation, not appropriation.

Creating and using land acknowledgement statements can be a concrete step toward bringing historical and contemporary oppression of Indigenous people into present consciousness. They can communicate appreciation and honor those whose land you now stand on. However, they can also show up as cultural appropriation or modern-day colonization.

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