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Voices and Views: February

Event Garde is committed to professional development, for ourselves and for our industry. As such, we’re avid readers of industry news. We’d like to share these must-reads with you.

Learn

Sitting in a classroom or at a conference staring at a talking head doesn’t get the job done when it comes to learning.

Instead, engagement is key to effective learning.

So how do organizations design engaging learning experiences?

In a recent Leading Learning podcast, Aaron Wolowiec, founder of Event Garde, and Tracy King, founder of InspirEd, discuss what is, and what isn’t, learner engagement, based on the e-book they co-authored on learner engagement.

“Part of what they’re on a mission to do is debunk the myth conception that learner engagement is getting learners to participate in an activity or contribute to discussion,” said Celisa Steele, of Tagoras.

Network

Superconnector.

It sounds like an IT term, but, in a new book, Scott Gerber and Ryan Paugh write about the success “superconnectors” have in forming relationships.

“Rather, superconnectors are information brokers who are constantly learning about others and constantly connecting,” a recent story in Entrepreneur explains. “Therefore, superconnections are relationships that are not only mutually beneficial but also the basis from which whole communities can be built.”

According to the authors, there are three pillars for making such connections: the art of selectivity, the power of association and habitual generosity.

“Being selective with both your time and the people you most closely associate with (i.e., your "inner circle") is crucial to being a successful superconnector,” the story says. “But, with that said, when you do select projects to dedicate yourself to, give your time generously.”

Transfer

According to Human Resource Executive, 10,000 people reach retirement age daily. Yikes.

And some of those people include top-level executives. In some cases, these are the people who have built an organization.

“Organizations assume a few meetings to download existing workload or priorities is all that is needed [for leadership knowledge transfers],” says Joe Ungemah, North America practice leader, talent management and organizational alignment at Willis Towers Watson. “What’s much more effective is creating opportunities for experiential learning, where new leaders are given exposure to the topics and decisions experienced by the incumbent, allowing for mentorship and conversation.”

On the heels of exodus comes Generation X, so employers should equip young professionals with the knowledge and skills necessary to lead. The time is now, Ungemah urges.

Gardian of the Month: Tracy Koenig-Poches

Tracy Koenig-Poches, director of instructional design for Event Garde, is Gardian of the Month.

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Designing impactful instructor-led learning experiences with the millennial in mind

When it comes to offering face-to-face learning experiences, such as a day-long interactive workshop or a 75-minute breakout session at a conference, associations must carefully consider the millennial learner’s needs and expectations.

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Bright Idea: Training to improve customer satisfaction

Understanding the importance of customer satisfaction, the RV Industry Association is introducing a new training institute for technicians.

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Voices and Views: July

Event Garde is committed to professional development, for ourselves and for our industry. As such, we’re avid readers of industry news. We’d like to share these must-reads with you.

Read More >

Who is Generation Z and how will they impact the future of associations?

Generation Z can be defined as those born between 1997 and 2010. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, Gen Z outnumbers millennials and baby boomers, making up 25 percent of the population.

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What The Tonight Show teaches us about learning

Learners who can’t find the quality education they need to compete within their chosen profession will be forced to select alternative options. Therefore, we need to stop creating and sharing with speakers a laundry list of dos and don’ts. If that were enough for them to create truly transformational experiences, they would have happened by now.

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